Citizens angry at mass blackout throughout Egypt
YOUM7 (Archive)
By GHADA ATEF

CAIRO: Citizens throughout Egypt were frustrated and expressed their anger at the largest number of blackouts this year on Monday. The Ministry of Electricity announced in a press statement that the domestic electricity load, on average at 2,000 megawatts, increased to 6,000 megawatts for the first time in its history, Youm7 reported.

Many residents said Monday was the worst case of blackouts in a year and in many cases caused trouble in their home electricity machines. One resident in October City, Cairo Yassmin Adel told The Cairo Post that the blackouts in the neighborhood before August were two or three times a week for an hour each time: “Now the number rose to three times a day for an hour and half each time.”

She experienced four blackouts, each time for an hour and half on Monday.

The ministry official source said the crisis might worsen even after some power stations were targeted and destroyed in the latest sabotage events. “If the ministry could not find a solution to provide more amounts of fuel, the crisis will be aggravated by the end of August,” he said.

Some areas in Faisal, Giza witnessed more blackouts than it did electricity; some cases for five whole hours, the electricity come return for an hour or two, then blackout again.

Ayat G. lives in Obour City and Cairo told The Cairo Post that the blackout caused her air condition to shut down. She said the blackouts in her district are not as bad compared with the more heavily populated cities but still they do still affect the home electrical appliances.

In Alexandria, the power blackout lasted for 8 hours at different times during the day, according to resident Amani K.

“For the last two months, we have been living with an electricity generator to avoid the many hours of the blackout daily,” Sharqia governorate resident Fawzeya S. told The Cairo Post.

The energy crisis in Egypt is worsening due to the shortage of fuel, according to ministry officials. Citizens expected President Abdel Fatah al-Sisi’s new government to find a solution to the problem soon.

Minister of Electricity Mohamed Shaker signed Monday  two contracts with steam-powered electricity stations in Suez at the total cost of 102 million EGP ($14.26 million) to counter the increase in electrical load and to provide power to all areas of development. The project will be ready to run at full capacity in April 2016, according to a statement published on the ministry’s official website.

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